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Jackson Stewart
Jackson Stewart

Becoming His By Albany Walker


Graduating at 18 from Oberlin College with the highest honors in his Conservatoryclass, he was admitted to the Curtis Institute of Music to study piano with Rudolf Serkin,chamber music with William Primrose and Gregor Piatigorsky, and composition with RosarioScalero, teacher of Samuel Barber. He graduated from the Curtis Institute withArtist Diplomas in piano and composition in 1945, becoming the first black graduate ofthis renown music school.




Becoming His by Albany Walker



Graduating at 18 from Oberlin College with the highest honors in his Conservatory class, he was admitted to the Curtis Institute of Music to study piano with Rudolf Serkin, chamber music with William Primrose and Gregor Piatigorsky, and composition with Rosario Scalero, teacher of Samuel Barber. He graduated from the Curtis Institute with Artist Diplomas in piano and composition in 1945, becoming the first black graduate of this renown music school.


A native of Chesterfield, S.C., Judge Victoria S. Darrisaw has been working in the Dougherty County Judicial Circuit for more than 20 years, first as an Assistant District Attorney, before becoming Magistrate Court Judge. Following her time as Magistrate, Judge Darrisaw served as State Court Judge in the circuit before being named to the Superior Court in 2018. Judge Darrisaw holds a BA in Political Science from Spelman College, where she graduated cum laude. She received her JD from the Walter F. George School of Law at Mercer University.


WILLIAM G. CHEENEY, of lawful age, being duly sworn, deposes and says: That he was born in the State of New York, emigrated to Missouri in the year 1855, and was engaged in publishing a newspaper at Jefferson City, Mo., until May, 1861; that in June, 1861, he proceeded from Jefferson City, by his own conveyance, to Memphis, Tenn., and from there to Richmond, where he expected to pursue his avocation of printing. At that time he believed the action of the Southern States in seceding was warrantable and just, but upon becoming thoroughly acquainted with their objects and motives saw the mistake made, and at the expiration of some thirteen months returned to Washington, D. C., under an assumed name, bringing with him information to President Lincoln of great importance. This information was reduced to writing and handed to the porter at the White House about the 1st of September, 1861. Said letter was signed Wm. L. Walker. 041b061a72


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